Renovating an Older Home

Renovating an Older Home

As much as we might see it happening around us, not many can say they’re well-versed in construction.  We asked renovations and building expert, Daryl Berden of Ridgewater Homes, Your heritage Home Renovations Questions.

Canadian Home Trends

How Do you feel about heritage Homes Being Demolished?

Daryl Berden

Unfortunately, the demolition of heritage structures happens all-too-frequently, Rather than eliminating this structures entirely, we should be preserving what we can for environmental and cost-related reasons.  Oftentimes, heritage homes are structurally sound and have good bones, and the process of preserving them and improving upon the aesthetic detailing takes a lesser environmental toll than building from scratch.  Preserving heritage homes also allows us to blend old and new, to create something unique, mid-modern, and durable.

Canadian Home Trends

Is it worth renovating an old house?

Daryl Berden

As with any major construction project, renovating an older build takes a lot of research, work, and dedication.  Oftentimes, you can’t know what you’re getting into, in terms of internal wear and tear, until you’ve started renovating, so you have to anticipate some surprises, which could cost you times and money.  Ultimately, renovating an older home tends to be a lot more work than building new, but in the end, you’ll have a new property that’s built to last and that has history.

Canadian Home Trends

What’s the most common thing people ask for in a kitchen renovation?

Daryl Berden

To eliminate walls and create an open floor plan, so that you have more space to entertain guests and convene with family.  When you open up a floor plan, not only do you create more space but you make better use of your natural light

 

Canadian Home Trends Magazine

Aug 1, 2018

 

For More Information: Ridgewater Homes